Covid-19: The painful price of ignoring health inequities – The BMJ

Unfortunately, we are quick to respond when there is an urgent risk to our own safety or those we care about; and quick to forget when the crisis has passed and the only perceivable danger is to ‘others.’  Our tendency to distance ourselves from those we view as alien or intrinsically different from us puts everyone in danger. It is a fundamental misunderstanding of a risk that is always there and that can be mitigated only through effective contingency planning, requiring trust and a common denominator of commitment to our shared humanity. 
— Read on blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2020/03/18/covid-19-the-painful-price-of-ignoring-health-inequities/

A Texting Intervention in Latino Families to Reduce ED Use: A Randomized Trial

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Latino children in immigrant families experience health care disparities. Text messaging interventions for this population may address disparities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a Spanish-language text messaging intervention on infant emergency department use and well care and vaccine adherence.

METHODS: The Salud al Día intervention, an educational video and interactive text messages throughout the child’s first year of life, was evaluated via randomized controlled trial conducted in an urban, academic pediatric primary care practice from February 2016 to December 2017. Inclusion criteria were publicly insured singleton infant <2 months of age; parent age >18, with Spanish as the preferred health care language; and at least 1 household cellular phone. Primary outcomes were abstracted from the electronic medical record at age 15 months. Intention-to-treat analyses were used.

RESULTS: A total of 157 parent-child dyads were randomly assigned to Salud al Día (n = 79) or control groups (n = 78). Among all participants, mean parent age was 29.3 years (SD: 6.2 years), mean years in the United States was 7.3 (SD: 5.3 years), and 87% of parents had limited or marginal health literacy. The incidence rate ratio for emergency department use for the control versus intervention group was 1.48 (95% confidence interval: 1.04–2.12). A greater proportion of intervention infants received 2 flu vaccine doses compared with controls (81% vs 67%; P = .04).

CONCLUSIONS: This Spanish-language text messaging intervention reduced emergency department use and increased flu vaccine receipt among a population at high risk for health care disparities. Tailored text message interventions are a promising method for addressing disparities.

An interesting study that would be interesting to replicate in the Australian context with culturally and linguistically diverse populations.

Source: A Texting Intervention in Latino Families to Reduce ED Use: A Randomized Trial

Coordination of health care: experiences of barriers to accessing health services among patients aged 45 and over

Those who needed to use health services the most, were more likely to not see a GP or specialist when they felt they needed to. In 2016, after adjusting for the effects of other patient characteristics, patients with high health needs were 3.3 times as likely as those with low health needs to report that there was a time when they felt they needed to see a GP but did not go.

Evidence of the persistence of the inverse care law in the new AIHW report on Coordination of health care: experiences of barriers to accessing health services among patients aged 45 and over.

COVID-19: Lessons from South Korea’s quick response | Croakey

It is now my turn to ask my Australian colleagues how concerned should you be? Do we have the plans, institutional trust and social conventions to get us through? The consequences of any perceived mishandling of the COVID-19 response could be severe, especially coming so soon after the national bushfire emergency of last summer.

Good insights from this article by Jinhee Kim on COVID-19: Lessons from South Korea’s quick response

Do general practice management and/or team care arrangements reduce avoidable hospitalisations in Central and Eastern Sydney, Australia?

New paper published in BMC Health Services Research with colleagues from CPHCE, SESLHD, SLHD and CESPHN:

There was no evidence to suggest that the use of [General Practice Management Plans] and/or [Team Care Arrangements] has prevented hospitalisations in the Central and Eastern Sydney region.

Source: Do general practice management and/or team care arrangements reduce avoidable hospitalisations in Central and Eastern Sydney, Australia?

 

Ethical Protocol for evaluation in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander settings

The ethical protocol provides principles and guidance on how to respect the elders, cultural knowledge, and lands and seas of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. It provides a tool to frame and design an ethical approach to apply throughout all stages of monitoring and evaluation tasks and processes.
— Read on www.betterevaluation.org/en/themes/indigenous_evaluation/ethical_protocol

Peer reviewers need a code of conduct too

Learning to accept criticism is part of surviving the fierce competition in research. But an invitation to review the work of a peer, usually anonymously, is not a licence to patronize, intimidate or otherwise act in a way that would be unprofessional in the workplace. Such reviews are unnecessarily discouraging, particularly to an early-career researcher with limited experience of the system.
— Read on www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02492-w

Hell yes to this. Reviewer 2 types need to be much more accountable for their conduct and general incivility.

Political Scenarios for Climate Disaster

There is no realistic scenario for addressing climate change that does not involve a comprehensive reorganization of human societies in the reasonably near term. Yet we emphasize reorganization, not collapse or apocalypse. As a species, humanity will almost certainly survive the coming centuries. But who will survive, and how they will live, is genuinely uncertain. The distribution of the burdens of substantial adaptation—which is now inevitable, whatever the extent of future carbon mitigation—and the political-economic means by which distribution is implemented: these are urgent issues facing us all.
— Read on www.dissentmagazine.org/article/political-scenarios-for-climate-disaster