Do general practice management and/or team care arrangements reduce avoidable hospitalisations in Central and Eastern Sydney, Australia?

New paper published in BMC Health Services Research with colleagues from CPHCE, SESLHD, SLHD and CESPHN:

There was no evidence to suggest that the use of [General Practice Management Plans] and/or [Team Care Arrangements] has prevented hospitalisations in the Central and Eastern Sydney region.

Source: Do general practice management and/or team care arrangements reduce avoidable hospitalisations in Central and Eastern Sydney, Australia?

 

On the risks of general practice by smartphone, and who’s excluded by (and through) mHealth initiatives

Answers to some questions about GP at Hand come from a recent independent evaluation.2

The evaluation confirms that GP at Hand caters principally to a healthy, affluent, young, and working population: 98.5% of patients are aged 20-64,3 two thirds live in affluent areas, and only 0.1% are cared for by the service’s “chronic care team.”

Registered patients found GP at Hand convenient and used the service more often than they did their previous practice, also reducing their previous high use of other urgent NHS services. However, a quarter of GP at Hand’s newly registered patients move back to a conventional NHS practice, many within two weeks.

— Read on www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l4713

Quality in general practice

…PIP QI [Practice Incentive Payment Quality Improvement] is a top-down quality improvement strategy. Funding is based on data extraction for 10 quantitative measures that are shared with the local Primary Health Networks (PHNs). The practice then must engage in a quality improvement project, with vague descriptors of qualifying activities. The secretive nature of negotiations about the content of PIP QI has excluded the medical profession and the people we are trying to treat. The 10 measures are relatively crude, including percentage of patients who smoke, patients with diabetes with recent glycated haemoglobin recording, and patient weight recordings.

These limited measures are far too narrow to assess a complex system such as general practice. Rather than driving quality improvement, the focus becomes one of coding for the purposes of data extraction.

Source: We need to talk about quality in general practice

Interesting post from members of the GPs Down Under Facebook group.

Factors influencing interprofessional collaboration between community pharmacists and general practitioners—A systematic review

The review findings highlight a range of approaches that may positively influence interprofessional collaboration between GPs and CPS such as co‐location, co‐education to understand the professional capabilities of each group, and utilising compatible technologies to facilitate communication between the two professions.

Source: Factors influencing interprofessional collaboration between community pharmacists and general practitioners—A systematic review – Bollen – 2019 – Health & Social Care in the Community – Wiley Online Library